For those of you who just got your diagnosis, this might seem nuts, but for those of you who have lived with chronic illness for some time, I hope it makes sense.

Having a chronic illness is not mean the end!

You don’t have to stop doing everything you love. Sure, you might have to adapt some of it, but in most cases you can go on doing it in some way or another. I say ‘in most cases’ because there are always exceptions.

Aa paraplegic climbing mountains might seem impossible to some people. But I’ve seen paraplegics take their chairs up mountains, so it’s not impossible. This video is of one of those people.

If you’re a painter, and you lose your sight, that doesn’t mean you have to stop doing art. There are lots of blind artists. The adaptation here might be to another medium. The picture below was made by a blind artist. His name is Ricky Trione, and if you want to see more of him paintings, just click the picture.

 

My Buddy by Ricky Trione, a painting of a sea turtle surrounded by pink fish

If you’re a musician and you lose your hearing, you can still feel the rhythm in your body.

I’m using pretty extreme examples here because I know there are people with conditions like Rheumatoid Arthritis that just stop and give up.

There will, of course, be days, or even months when you’re unable to do this. Maybe a hospital stay or a bad spell. But you’ll do so much better psychologically if you don’t give it up. If you have a goal of being able to do what you love, you’ll get there, and if you’re thinking positively, it will get you there faster than digging yourself into a hole will.

I’ve been living with chronic pain for over 20 years, and I don’t let it stop me. Of course, there are bad days. I’ve got a painting I didn’t finish on Sunday, as planned because I had to rest and let the meds do their job. But as soon as I was able to, I was back at it again.

Keep at it, don’t give up your dreams!

If you’d like some help with motivation and finding what your dream is, book yourself a Virtual Cup of Tea right now! (Also available in Swedish and Norwegian)

26 Comments

  1. Caro Ness

    I am with you on this. I have MS, so have personal experience of it! Sure, there are days when frankly, I could scream, but I have learned how to pace myself! Nothing is quick, but it DOES get done!

    Reply
    • linda

      Things get done here too, but not at the pace I’d like them too. After 20 years I’m still getting used to a slower pace. Patience is one of those fancy cars, isn’t it? I’m glad I’m “only” hypermobile and it only affects connective tissue and cartilage. A lot of people have harder fights to take on.

      Reply
  2. Sibylle

    Hear, hear! I admire you so much for keeping your spirits up and living your life as you want it despite the chronic pain. I can’t even begin to imagine what that must be like.
    Sharing this 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      I think what gets me through the bad spells is my crativity, magic, and that I’m so bloody stubborn 😀 And as for imagining what it’s like; you’ve been through things I’ve never been through, so you know what it’s like. Thanks for sharing it Sibylle.

      Reply
  3. Jan

    I can’t imagine what it’s like living with chronic pain, good on you for not letting it beat you. Thank you for sharing the inspiring examples of people doing what they love despite their problems too 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      Thank you 🙂 The pain I’m used to, it’s the fatigue that annoys me the most. That’s what keeps me from doing what I want some days.

      Reply
  4. Colleen Burke

    Nice article, Linda. As a practitioner working with the chronically ill (and having healed myself of chronic illness), I totally agree that the right mental attitude makes all the difference – and it’s the hardest thing to do sometimes too! :). Thanks for sharing the encouraging words.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it’s hard yes. And it’s something that is’t just done once. It’s something you have to keep tabs on every day. I definitely have off days, more than I’d like. But it’s better than it was.

      Reply
  5. Sulata

    Thank you for the reminder to always look for those that are doing what you want to do but think you can’t! I always watch a video of a guy who was told he would never walk again, bound by his wheelchair and chronic pain ….. by the end of the video, he was running! Inspirational and motivational …. 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      We all have days when we forget to sa “F this” and do it anyway. Me too. I hope this can serve as a reminder for those who haven’t tried yet.

      Reply
  6. Amethyst Mahoney

    Great post, Linda. I’m an Army Veteran with a hidden disability, but I still struggle with it when I can’t do something. I don’t know that I’ll personally ever get over it, but it does get me on the rides first at Disneyland, where I have to use a wheelchair, so I guess that’s something.

    Reply
  7. Peggy Lusk

    Linda, This is a great reminder for all of us. Each person’s “optimal” health is different from everyone else, and changes over time. One of the secrets to aging successfully is to keep pushing yourself with a focus on the things you CAN do, not the things you can’t.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it is and it does 🙂 I’m the “do it anyway” kind, within limits of course.

      Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂

      Reply
  8. Carol Trickett

    Thanks Linda for a great article. When my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s we decided to continue to live life as we always had to the best of our ability. This has made all the difference in staying on the sunny side of life and not getting sucked into a sad hopeless cave. You are so right, we have a choice.

    Reply
    • linda

      Alsheimer’s is a difficult one to live with. I’m glad you’ve found a way.

      Reply
  9. Leanne Chesser

    Good for you for not letting your chronic pain stop you. I don’t have a chronic illness, but I love stories about people who pursue their dreams regardless of any health challenges. One is Kyle Maynard who wrote a book called “No Excuses.” He was born without arms or legs, but became a champion wrestler. Very inspiring.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I haven’t read it, but it sure sounds inspiring.

      Reply
  10. Emily

    As a chronic pain fighter of nearing 15 years, I can really relate to this post. So many of my followers on my Fibromyalgia blog have all but given up. because the symptoms have taken over so completely, but I always try to offer words of encouragement and inspiration and focus NOT on what I can’t do, but what I can do. And over the years what I can do is actually quite alot as long as I manage my pain and other symptoms properly.

    Reply
    • linda

      Fibro is one diagnosis I’m very happy to not have. It’s so much more than pain. I understand those who nearly give up, and expecially in those countries where they’re not automatically entitled to help. Over the years we learn what we can do by pushing the limits 🙂

      Reply
  11. Loralee

    Great reminder Linda. I’ve had chronic pain since my late teens & I go through times where I want to completely give up & other times where I’m out climbing mountains & on fabulous adventures – modified for me. It sure is possible!

    Reply
    • linda

      Yes, it is 🙂

      Reply
  12. Sara

    Wow, amazing huh? Thanks for sharing these inspiring stories. I don’t have a chronic disease but the “condition” I have is chronic meaning there is no cure – it is something I’ll have to deal with for the rest of my life.

    I really know what the hole is and pray everyday not to fall in it again. Positive thinking and being around those who fight everyday to stay afloat is what has brought me this far.

    Thanks for sharing your story it will help many people.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I’m glad you’re staying afloat 🙂

      Reply

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26 Comments

  1. Caro Ness

    I am with you on this. I have MS, so have personal experience of it! Sure, there are days when frankly, I could scream, but I have learned how to pace myself! Nothing is quick, but it DOES get done!

    Reply
    • linda

      Things get done here too, but not at the pace I’d like them too. After 20 years I’m still getting used to a slower pace. Patience is one of those fancy cars, isn’t it? I’m glad I’m “only” hypermobile and it only affects connective tissue and cartilage. A lot of people have harder fights to take on.

      Reply
  2. Sibylle

    Hear, hear! I admire you so much for keeping your spirits up and living your life as you want it despite the chronic pain. I can’t even begin to imagine what that must be like.
    Sharing this 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      I think what gets me through the bad spells is my crativity, magic, and that I’m so bloody stubborn 😀 And as for imagining what it’s like; you’ve been through things I’ve never been through, so you know what it’s like. Thanks for sharing it Sibylle.

      Reply
  3. Jan

    I can’t imagine what it’s like living with chronic pain, good on you for not letting it beat you. Thank you for sharing the inspiring examples of people doing what they love despite their problems too 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      Thank you 🙂 The pain I’m used to, it’s the fatigue that annoys me the most. That’s what keeps me from doing what I want some days.

      Reply
  4. Colleen Burke

    Nice article, Linda. As a practitioner working with the chronically ill (and having healed myself of chronic illness), I totally agree that the right mental attitude makes all the difference – and it’s the hardest thing to do sometimes too! :). Thanks for sharing the encouraging words.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it’s hard yes. And it’s something that is’t just done once. It’s something you have to keep tabs on every day. I definitely have off days, more than I’d like. But it’s better than it was.

      Reply
  5. Sulata

    Thank you for the reminder to always look for those that are doing what you want to do but think you can’t! I always watch a video of a guy who was told he would never walk again, bound by his wheelchair and chronic pain ….. by the end of the video, he was running! Inspirational and motivational …. 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      We all have days when we forget to sa “F this” and do it anyway. Me too. I hope this can serve as a reminder for those who haven’t tried yet.

      Reply
  6. Amethyst Mahoney

    Great post, Linda. I’m an Army Veteran with a hidden disability, but I still struggle with it when I can’t do something. I don’t know that I’ll personally ever get over it, but it does get me on the rides first at Disneyland, where I have to use a wheelchair, so I guess that’s something.

    Reply
  7. Peggy Lusk

    Linda, This is a great reminder for all of us. Each person’s “optimal” health is different from everyone else, and changes over time. One of the secrets to aging successfully is to keep pushing yourself with a focus on the things you CAN do, not the things you can’t.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it is and it does 🙂 I’m the “do it anyway” kind, within limits of course.

      Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂

      Reply
  8. Carol Trickett

    Thanks Linda for a great article. When my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s we decided to continue to live life as we always had to the best of our ability. This has made all the difference in staying on the sunny side of life and not getting sucked into a sad hopeless cave. You are so right, we have a choice.

    Reply
    • linda

      Alsheimer’s is a difficult one to live with. I’m glad you’ve found a way.

      Reply
  9. Leanne Chesser

    Good for you for not letting your chronic pain stop you. I don’t have a chronic illness, but I love stories about people who pursue their dreams regardless of any health challenges. One is Kyle Maynard who wrote a book called “No Excuses.” He was born without arms or legs, but became a champion wrestler. Very inspiring.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I haven’t read it, but it sure sounds inspiring.

      Reply
  10. Emily

    As a chronic pain fighter of nearing 15 years, I can really relate to this post. So many of my followers on my Fibromyalgia blog have all but given up. because the symptoms have taken over so completely, but I always try to offer words of encouragement and inspiration and focus NOT on what I can’t do, but what I can do. And over the years what I can do is actually quite alot as long as I manage my pain and other symptoms properly.

    Reply
    • linda

      Fibro is one diagnosis I’m very happy to not have. It’s so much more than pain. I understand those who nearly give up, and expecially in those countries where they’re not automatically entitled to help. Over the years we learn what we can do by pushing the limits 🙂

      Reply
  11. Loralee

    Great reminder Linda. I’ve had chronic pain since my late teens & I go through times where I want to completely give up & other times where I’m out climbing mountains & on fabulous adventures – modified for me. It sure is possible!

    Reply
    • linda

      Yes, it is 🙂

      Reply
  12. Sara

    Wow, amazing huh? Thanks for sharing these inspiring stories. I don’t have a chronic disease but the “condition” I have is chronic meaning there is no cure – it is something I’ll have to deal with for the rest of my life.

    I really know what the hole is and pray everyday not to fall in it again. Positive thinking and being around those who fight everyday to stay afloat is what has brought me this far.

    Thanks for sharing your story it will help many people.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I’m glad you’re staying afloat 🙂

      Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. I can't because...don't let excuses stop you - […] I’m disabled: So am I, people in wheelchairs dance, and blind people paint. […]

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26 Comments

  1. Caro Ness

    I am with you on this. I have MS, so have personal experience of it! Sure, there are days when frankly, I could scream, but I have learned how to pace myself! Nothing is quick, but it DOES get done!

    Reply
    • linda

      Things get done here too, but not at the pace I’d like them too. After 20 years I’m still getting used to a slower pace. Patience is one of those fancy cars, isn’t it? I’m glad I’m “only” hypermobile and it only affects connective tissue and cartilage. A lot of people have harder fights to take on.

      Reply
  2. Sibylle

    Hear, hear! I admire you so much for keeping your spirits up and living your life as you want it despite the chronic pain. I can’t even begin to imagine what that must be like.
    Sharing this 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      I think what gets me through the bad spells is my crativity, magic, and that I’m so bloody stubborn 😀 And as for imagining what it’s like; you’ve been through things I’ve never been through, so you know what it’s like. Thanks for sharing it Sibylle.

      Reply
  3. Jan

    I can’t imagine what it’s like living with chronic pain, good on you for not letting it beat you. Thank you for sharing the inspiring examples of people doing what they love despite their problems too 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      Thank you 🙂 The pain I’m used to, it’s the fatigue that annoys me the most. That’s what keeps me from doing what I want some days.

      Reply
  4. Colleen Burke

    Nice article, Linda. As a practitioner working with the chronically ill (and having healed myself of chronic illness), I totally agree that the right mental attitude makes all the difference – and it’s the hardest thing to do sometimes too! :). Thanks for sharing the encouraging words.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it’s hard yes. And it’s something that is’t just done once. It’s something you have to keep tabs on every day. I definitely have off days, more than I’d like. But it’s better than it was.

      Reply
  5. Sulata

    Thank you for the reminder to always look for those that are doing what you want to do but think you can’t! I always watch a video of a guy who was told he would never walk again, bound by his wheelchair and chronic pain ….. by the end of the video, he was running! Inspirational and motivational …. 🙂

    Reply
    • linda

      We all have days when we forget to sa “F this” and do it anyway. Me too. I hope this can serve as a reminder for those who haven’t tried yet.

      Reply
  6. Amethyst Mahoney

    Great post, Linda. I’m an Army Veteran with a hidden disability, but I still struggle with it when I can’t do something. I don’t know that I’ll personally ever get over it, but it does get me on the rides first at Disneyland, where I have to use a wheelchair, so I guess that’s something.

    Reply
  7. Peggy Lusk

    Linda, This is a great reminder for all of us. Each person’s “optimal” health is different from everyone else, and changes over time. One of the secrets to aging successfully is to keep pushing yourself with a focus on the things you CAN do, not the things you can’t.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks, it is and it does 🙂 I’m the “do it anyway” kind, within limits of course.

      Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂

      Reply
  8. Carol Trickett

    Thanks Linda for a great article. When my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s we decided to continue to live life as we always had to the best of our ability. This has made all the difference in staying on the sunny side of life and not getting sucked into a sad hopeless cave. You are so right, we have a choice.

    Reply
    • linda

      Alsheimer’s is a difficult one to live with. I’m glad you’ve found a way.

      Reply
  9. Leanne Chesser

    Good for you for not letting your chronic pain stop you. I don’t have a chronic illness, but I love stories about people who pursue their dreams regardless of any health challenges. One is Kyle Maynard who wrote a book called “No Excuses.” He was born without arms or legs, but became a champion wrestler. Very inspiring.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I haven’t read it, but it sure sounds inspiring.

      Reply
  10. Emily

    As a chronic pain fighter of nearing 15 years, I can really relate to this post. So many of my followers on my Fibromyalgia blog have all but given up. because the symptoms have taken over so completely, but I always try to offer words of encouragement and inspiration and focus NOT on what I can’t do, but what I can do. And over the years what I can do is actually quite alot as long as I manage my pain and other symptoms properly.

    Reply
    • linda

      Fibro is one diagnosis I’m very happy to not have. It’s so much more than pain. I understand those who nearly give up, and expecially in those countries where they’re not automatically entitled to help. Over the years we learn what we can do by pushing the limits 🙂

      Reply
  11. Loralee

    Great reminder Linda. I’ve had chronic pain since my late teens & I go through times where I want to completely give up & other times where I’m out climbing mountains & on fabulous adventures – modified for me. It sure is possible!

    Reply
    • linda

      Yes, it is 🙂

      Reply
  12. Sara

    Wow, amazing huh? Thanks for sharing these inspiring stories. I don’t have a chronic disease but the “condition” I have is chronic meaning there is no cure – it is something I’ll have to deal with for the rest of my life.

    I really know what the hole is and pray everyday not to fall in it again. Positive thinking and being around those who fight everyday to stay afloat is what has brought me this far.

    Thanks for sharing your story it will help many people.

    Reply
    • linda

      Thanks 🙂 I’m glad you’re staying afloat 🙂

      Reply

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